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Posts by JLibourel

White tuxedo jackets in late November? How utterly inappropriate! I mean, even here in SoCal it can get pretty chilly and miserable 'round about then. If they have aspirations to formality, as it would seem, at least let them do it right. I don't believe that the father of the bride need be attired identically to the wedding party. However, since the white jacket tuxedoes seem to be big with your daughter and her fiance, isn't it probably most simple to pony up $150 (or...
I am assuming you are talking here about wearing a shirt open-necked with the T-shirt exposed. As a general matter, wearing a white, undershirt-like T-shirt with an open-collar shirt looks like hell. Just don't do it. If you want to wear a T-shirt with an open collar shirt, make it a V-neck. An exception would be a heavy, colored, crew-necked T-shirt with something like a flannel or chamois-cloth shirt. I think this is a nice cool-weather casual look. Just my $.02.
As a veteran of '70s styles, let me point out that a typical leisure suit jacket does not have wide lapels. As best I recall, it didn't have any lapels. It was a sort of shirt jacket with no interlining and worn with matching pants. If you can find some pix of Lee Majors as the Six-Million Dollar Man, you can probably get a better idea of what I am talking about, as the character wore leisure suits for many of his adventures. The suits and sport coats of the '70s were of...
One of my best pals is a veteran professor of political science. He think Trump has a fair chance of winning. FWIW, he thought it very probable if Trump wins that we could expect the Capitol building to burn within 90 days!
Wrong! What are customarily called "Baltic" languages--Latvian, Lithuanian and Prussian [extinct]--are Indo-European languages. Like the Slavic languages they are in the Eastern (satem) group of Indo-European languages. Some linguists have posited an original "Balto-Slavonic" root-language ancestral to both groups. Others have denied this and claimed that linguistic similarities between the Baltic and Slavic languages come from Slavic "loan words" entering into currency in...
We reviewed the Sphinx pistols when I was editing Handguns magazine. This would have been at the time they arrived on the U.S. market back around 1992 or 1993. As I recall, they were okay, with no signal virtues or notable faults that we could descry. I personally wouldn't trade any of the nine Colt 1911-style pistols I own for one, but then I was never particularly impressed by the CZ tribe of pistols. They were okay, but I never could understand the hoopla over them...
^Well, I don't know if you can generalize from my experience with a couple of guns. I notice you mentioned using snap caps with your single actions. You may or may not be aware that with traditional single actions, those that don't have a transfer bar, like Colts and old model Rugers, you don't need snap caps. Just cut a short length of rawhide boot lace, fold it over and tuck under the firing pin hole (or firing pin in the case of old model Rugers) and you can dry snap to...
It happened to me several times with a Colt Trooper .357 Magnum (the old-style Trooper with the same lockwork as the Python). I finally got rid of it. This had the frame mounted firing pin. I think it happened once with my first Smith & Wesson M&P (Model 10). Thus, I don't like any extensive dry-snapping of revolvers without snap caps. With most auto pistols I don't find this an issue. I did once crack the firing pin retainer on my first Colt Government Model, but of...
There are two major advantages to hammer-mounted firing pins: You can see at a glance that the firing pin is intact. Also, you can check and see if the firing pin is about to break by pinching it and giving it a twist. Like yourself, I prefer a visible, i.e., hammer-mounted, firing pin. The foremost advantage to frame-mounted firing pins is that they are supposed to be less subject to primer extrusions pushing back into the firing pin hole and typing up the gun. That said,...
Well, Smith & Wesson .22 revolvers have had frame-mounted firing pins for many, many years. Do you have a beef with them? On the other hand, I have heard it claimed that the locks can malfunction and tie up the gun unexpectedly. Aesthetically, they are abominable, too, I think, making the gun look like a wind-up toy. I also distrust the MIM parts in the newer guns. I love and cherish my vintage Smith revolvers dearly, but I am uninterested in the newer guns. Perhaps,...
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