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Posts by mgm9128

No real recipe. Just mix an egg yolk with a teaspoon of dijon mustard and whisk in a little red wine or sherry venegar, then start pouring in oil in a very slow stream. I use grapeseed. Add enough until you get your desired consistency. Thin with a little cold water if need be. Season.
Grouse with celery root, foie gras and muscat grapes
Grouse in whiskey
Can someone please recommend to me a good bird's beak knife?
It's most likely a misprint. That is the only issue I take with the book, as I have spotted quite a few. But common sense and an existing knowledge of basic preparations has been helpful in navigating through it.
The Grand Livre ehkay lent me has, without doubt, been the most inspiring book I've cooked from yet. In each recipe there is an underlying focus on fundamental technique, and a respect to classical cuisine, yet not an enslavement to it. There is a confidence and freedom to his style, and the recipes reflect this well. The detail and structure of the book is intimidating at first, even to someone that has cooked intently from some of the more "involved" cookbooks, but very...
That's a good point. I am not aware of the inner workings to his business model, or the daily operations of his restaurants, so I can't offer a more detailed opinion. Really, I just enjoy cooking from his cookbooks and think he's pretty badass, so I tend to support his ventures with unexamined enthusiasm. Also, this is the way I eat at home, and feel is ultimately the healthiest sort of diet, both for the body, and for the planet.
There's a version of the recipe without lobster in which the potatoes are studded with verbena leaves. Same sauce of Noilly Prat. It would still be delicious that way..
It's one of my favorite recipes. If you can find nice verbena, you should definitely make it.
It really depends on the quality of the dried fruit. These were Turkish apricots that I chose specifically because of their high moisture content. Some of them are overly dried and become tough and chewy. I had one from a farmer in Santa Barbara that probably took me a minute total to chew and digest. The Turkish ones are more tender, and sort of blossom in the butter they're warmed in.
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