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Posts by NorCal_1

^ that's funny but trust me, had you grown up in Boston like I did and lived to see the evolution of Louis, you would know what is now missing (the void it's leaving behind) seeing Zegna and Luciano Barbera and Belvest and Kiton and Vestimenta (now gone) in the early days was special
the problem all the brick and mortar stores face is kind of like the problem wine retailers face - they have to accept a lot of bad stuff in a collection just to get the few good pieces Murray realized that and worked with the Italian houses to cater to his high standard of taste and didn't accept their junk. He had the power to say no that most don't have today. He either cherry picked the merchandise, influenced it ahead of time or picked our the fabrics himself for the...
the opposite of thatthey strayed too far from their base...the color schemes became either black monotone or Technicolor under Debi and I'm saying Murray wouldn't have gone there with any of his brandseven if the brands themselves went there, Murray would have insisted on his own picks of fabrics (olives and browns and charcoals and blues and earth tones) woven in creative ways to keep evolvingDebi went in the direction of Barney's hipster department, because Debi is a...
had Murray still been running the place, I'll bet he would have seen the changes in menswear coming and adapted better a) eg. seen the move toward softer, Neapolitan silhouettes and the serendipitous shift toward more casual dress at work and signed Boglioli, LBM, Lardini, etc to exclusive deals to win over the younger buyers who couldn't afford Kiton and Belvest and Zegna. He would have insisted on exclusive fabrics for them he chose to keep the margins and competitors...
new Rubinacci documentary being shown at Pitti trailers here: http://www.marianorubinacci.net/club/
that's what I was getting at.....her examples at the end showed no classic style whatsoeverNONE!
I think a lot can be gleaned from Debi Greenberg's post on menswear look at the arc of her story.... http://www.louisboston.com/louis-boston-where-have-all-the-icons-gone-menswear-history/
Eulogy for Louis Boston The demise of Louis heralds a new era of Boston blandification and the triumph of the ho-hum. By Rachel Slade | Bostonista | January 10, 2015 1:05 p.m. On Friday, Debi Greenberg announced that this July, she will shutter her independent retail outfit, Louis. For many of us, this doesn’t come as a surprise. Though Louis has been a fixture in the city for more than 85 years—first on Newbury Street and then in the Seaport—it’s had the stink of doom...
I used to go to those sales, too, when I was living in Boston in the early 90's and still have some great buys from those days. Btw, there's some historical background on the early days of Louis in Joseph Abboud's bookMurray did have extraordinary (classic) taste and he insisted on picking a lot of the fabrics himself and color schemes that were used - greys, browns, olives, creams in sort of like the Cucinelli or Loro Piana color palatte, but better. He pushed the Italian...
Debi didn't understand menswear like her father, that's for sure. When he left, it went downhill in terms of merchandising, which is unfortunate, because it happened just as Neapolitan tailoring was becoming known. Louis should have been there at the forefrontIf Murray was still running the place, I'm sure he would have also filled the gap at the lower and middle end by doing exclusive deals with Boglioli and LBM 1911 and Caruso as he did with 20 and 30 years before with ...
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