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Posts by E,TF

This is the regency chest I mentioned in the home ownership thread. This is another example of the sort of thing I like, purchased a couple of years ago at a provincial auction house. A work table, probably 1820/30s. Would have had a bag hanging underneath that slid out, to hold wool, silk and so on, while the top opens up to reveal compartments that would have held needles and other tools for embroidery, knitting, etc. One of the dealers I know was itching for me to...
I'll take some photos some time.One of the restorers I know, who's also a cabinet maker, does proper french polishing but says it's a real bitch because his workshop generally has loads of saw dust floating around in the air, which is your worst enemy when french polishing. So he has to spring clean the place, then do nothing at all in there for a while to let everything settle, before he can start polishing. I guess all that gets worked into the price.He's got some nice...
Yes it's not cheap. I like furniture that shows its life, has some knocks and bashes, old repairs etc. It has a sort of wabi-sabi appeal for me. It also fits in with the lived-in country house look we're trying to achieve. I do have a couple of guys I use for restoration - they generally want to go much further toward perfection than I do. Which is all fortunate as it works out much cheaper.I generally buy at smaller local auctions outside of london, and from a handful of...
The interior had been subjected to a pretty thorough "modernisation" by the previous owners: we've spent the last couple of years largely undoing what they did, trying to give it back the character of an old house. A bit of a labour of love. Did have a similar moment to you when we pulled up some carpet and discovered a hatch into a void between floors. No treasure inside alas. I'm thinking of the typical georgian/victorian london terrace house when I talk about tall...
Oh certainly can be done well, just wouldn't try it myself (I bet it's harder than it looks). Also a lot of modern stuff is long and low, and a lot of 19th C rooms are tall and narrow (in london at least) and both furniture and room can come off worse for the juxtaposition. The example you posted works in part because it's a nice big room.And yes, quite agree on eclecticism. Was by no means advocating a totalitarian approach. My house is 18th C and I have a sort of base of...
I highly recommend the o'tom tick twister -http://www.otom.com/how-to-remove-a-tickWorks a treat every time.
I came close to buying an art deco club chair once or twice a decade or so ago. Glad I didn't. But my father had a fantastic battered old leather chesterfield for decades and sold it when he downsized a few years ago. It was too big for the place I had at the time sadly, so I had to watch it go. I'd love to have that particular sofa now, but I've never really been tempted to buy another chesterfield.I think you can only judge these things on a case by case basis. Some...
Were you made up as a member of KIss at the time? That might help jog their memories.
I love chukkas, and just realised the only ones I own or lust after are in pebble grain, suede or cordovan. Hadn't really considered that before.Oddly I have a similar problem with chelseas, but not chukkas.
That does look pretty cool, but it's a noticeably odd place to hang a mirror so I'm not sure you're really achieving much. A more natural place for a mirror would be over the fireplace but that would be way too high for a TV. I hate TVs hung over fireplaces, too high to watch comfortably unless you're in a neck brace and ugly.
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