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Posts by Pendulum

More TB.
If my high school experience was anything to go by, a scrawny teen like OP would be better off fitting in with his peers rather than trying to dress older than he is. This is especially true as it seems to have the opposite effect due to his size. Whilst he may be better dressed than others of his age in the opinion of posters here, it's not their opinion that counts at that age and he is doing himself no favours really. He is just going to stand out, and not in a good way.
Fox can have my $10
I have to say you're doing very well at endearing yourself to the existing community. They do look a lot like Carrera Safari, but not the best picture to tell really.
http://www.oliverpeoples.com/shop/gr...eck-black.html Surely those in cocobolo or black? Can buy them from there too...
Quote: Originally Posted by DWFII ^ Thank you. I'll have to think about this. I keep coming back tot the idea of water molecules displacing air molecules in any volume of air. Tell me when I misstep... If we have two balloons one filled with nothing but air and the other with 5% water. which will be heavier/denser? No, I'm not arguing--henceforth I'll tell people/assume that moist air is lighter than dry air...but I just can't seem to get my head...
Quote: Originally Posted by Nicola Think of compressed gas. In it's heavily compressed form you have lots of gas in a small space. Now release the pressure and it goes flying around. If it gets cold enough oxygen does become a liquid. If water gets hot enough it turns to a gas (aka steam). In it's gas form you'll notice it rises. Although the reason the gas form of water rises is due to the temperature difference. PV=nRT therefore per unit...
Quote: Originally Posted by DWFII I have no credentials or expertise to question you but perhaps you could clarify by answering a few of my lingering doubts... Is oxygen heavier than water? If so, why does water pool and oxygen "float"? Oxygen, by its molecular weight is heavier than water, but that's neither here nor there. Water is liquid at room temperature, whereas pure oxygen is gas which means that water is far more dense than oxygen at...
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