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Posts by dieworkwear

Why not? That's why I go to my tailors. For the fit and style.Suitsupply obviously has to use slightly more affordable cloths, from more affordable mills, but the quality is the same. Again, unless you're putting "characteristics" into quality -- meaning you favor certain weaves, weights, finishing, etc. But the idea of quality becomes less meaningful if you define it so broadly.There are some RTW companies that genuinely use poor quality cloth. I don't think Suitsupply is...
At the amounts Suitsupply is purchasing cloth, the price per meter drops dramatically. Maybe to $30 per meter (or less). It's not the same as what tailors are paying.Also don't think the mills they use offer varying levels of quality, but feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. By quality, I also don't mean characteristic (weave, finishing, weight, etc), but rather the quality of the yarns, etc.
Spend couple time together by reading through a few thousand StyFo pages on indigo dyed shibori, the arte povera aesthetic, how to proxy off Y!JA, working with traveling tailors, gemmed vs. handwelted shoes, and how to read identifying manufacturer labels on suits.
Seriously, I think it was hard for me to appreciate this until I went to non-Western countries.I think it's fine to think that companies should be more socially responsible. I don't think anyone wants to see socially irresponsible behavior. I'm saying: when people bring this stuff up, in terms of actions, it always goes back to "buy local," "buy from rich countries," "buy less altogether," or "eschew capitalism."At which point, if you originally cared about the welfare of...
I'm left-leaning and believe in regulations, so I think FDR is great, but you're talking about post-industrial politics, which is a completely different thing than talking about how to develop pre-industrial societies.My point is that, if you look at economic development throughout history, it's always been at the hands of non-democratic governments, usually because it requires a bit of heavy coordination and (often) results in unequal distributions. Which have to be put...
I mean, you know. The Adam Smith line about the self interest of the baker, butcher, and baker. Yada yada.My point is that people who set up these policy systems aren't saying "how do we just screw these people over?" And fashion people go in because of political and economic infrastructures (meaning laws). There are autocrats who probably say that stuff, but people who do development don't.It's perfectly fine if fashion people go into these places in search of cheap...
Our discount sale culture is probably more detrimental to LCCs than just the amount we spend. I don't think there's anything wrong with buying things from China as it creates jobs -- frankly, even if it means those jobs are in places that are less-than-great. But the constant "can I get this for 50% off" squeezes everyone throughout the production chain. Am only arguing against people who 1) write off all Chinese-made goods (or any LCC good), 2) argue that we should only...
I don't think anyone here is arguing for worsening conditions. I'm sure everyone would agree that better working conditions, fairer trade relations, better equity, strong environmental protections, etc are all good. The question is just how do you get there.As an ex-WS banker, you probably know that the main criticism that developing countries have is that rich countries are trying to kick the ladder out from under them. I was at a conference a year ago or so, where a...
I haven't worked in factories, but I've worked in economic development. My other job is doing research in the field and writing reports for governments.Nobody likes sweatshops. Nobody goes into these places and thinks "how can we exploit these people?" It's a question of how do you pull a country out of poverty using macro-level policies. So, not little farm co-ops (which are fine, but do little for large-scale development).Amazingly, in my field, China is seen as an...
I think you're ignoring the other side of this coin. What you see as overconsumption here is the flip side of underconsumption in other countries. Those countries (China, India, Vietnam, etc) are poor. They make cheap t-shirts, which they sell to us so that they can have US dollars. They use those US dollars to buy things from us that you presumably don't think is just about overconsumption -- things like medicine, food, infrastructure, technology, etc. The growing...
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