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Posts by dieworkwear

That just seems like the kind of copy you'd turn out if you had a quick deadline and have to market basics that, frankly, kids probably don't want to wear because they don't have cartoon characters or whatever. And the design team there just made smaller versions of their basic clothes because making SpongeBob tees would be weird for Everlane.I don't know what else you could say about super basic clothes for kids. "Here are some luxurious, basic cashmere sweaters to help...
I think you guys are reading too much into this. The management there probably just decided to expand into kids' clothes. They sent it to the design team, who made some basics that fit with the overall Everlane aesthetic. Then that gets sent to marketing and copywriting, who are just used to churning out the same copy for everything ("ditched the embellishment," "essentials," "simplicity," etc).I mean, writing about clothes is a huge pain in the ass, and you end up relying...
I've had pretty good luck sending things to Rave FabriCARE in Arizona. The problem with leather is that it can react in unpredictable ways -- shrinking, fading, cracking, or losing color depending on the cleaning treatment. I think that's true for any cleaner, but it's more true if you send it to your local dry cleaning spot down the block, who's probably just shipping it off to the same mass-cleaning plants that everyone else uses (few dry cleaners own their own...
I've been happy with Smartwool. Easy to find on sale at Campmor.
Seems highly dependent on the tailor. If he or she is good, I don't see why not.There should be distinction here between fit and style. A tailor should give you something that fits perfectly on the first order. Whether you decide to change the style at the margins on subsequent commissions is up to you.
If you pick up a book, it might be worth distinguishing whether the book is about creating one-off patterns for a single person (ie something a bespoke tailor or at-home garment maker would do), or if it's for creating ready-to-wear patterns for a mass of people. As I understand it, the two processes are very different. A bespoke tailor can leave allowances in a garment and will rely heavily on the fitting process, whereas RTW makers have to get it right before the pattern...
+1I didn't know James was looking to crowdsource the financing for his work, but I agree with everything above. Plus, online crowdsourcing for media seems a lot more honest than the old traditional model (which is to rely on corporate dollars), and the new traditional model (which is to create advertorials). Asking people to pay for stories they want to see created is about as honest as it gets.Just to be clear, I'm not taking any money from anyone, but I don't begrudge...
Nice find, I hadn't seen that.The woman they ran into was Joohee, who is Drew's girlfriend. Her saying that Drew is "just an employee" isn't entirely fair. They live together and essentially share assets (practically speaking, even if not legally).IMO, that's why it's useful to publicize this, so that future investors, business partners, employers, and even employees might think twice about working with Drew. A quick Google search will turn up all sorts of stories about...
Not that I know of. It was an afternoon radio show; not a podcast.
It hasn't been ten years. Dopey was just making a point.
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