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Posts by Milhouse

Quote: Originally Posted by ama For eggs and delicate fish they are pretty useful. Perhaps not essential by the strictest definition, but I'd hate to be without them. I have All-Clad and Le Cruset for my cookware and the same for my bakeware (the sheet pans, loaf pans, etc. are AC and the stone stuff is LC). I learned how to cook eggs and fish in normal pans. I still cook eggs and fish in normal pans. I don't have a single non-stick pan.
Quote: Originally Posted by kwilkinson This is the rennet my pops uses. http://www.cheesemaking.com/store/p/...net-2-oz-.html He says for the casual cheesemaker, it's practically a lifetime supply. Also a good book I picked up a while back that is in communion with this thread is Wild Fermentation. It goes through so much info on preserving/fermented food. Vegetable ferments (kimchi, etc), bean ferments (soy sauce), Dairy and vegan ferments,...
Awesome. That has to be one of the single greatest things I've heard in a while.
Jams are pretty easy, they are just fruit and sugar. The canning process is what is tedious. . . lots of boiling water, sterilize the jars, pack the jars, lid the jars, process the jars, etc. I had to help do a lot of that as a child. I have horrible memories of making pickled beets. The smell of vinegar and beet was brutal. I can just barely tolerate beets these days. Another thing I've thought about is preserving herbs by making a liqueur or bitters.
Good point about the temptation to eat it before it is ready. A few friends of mine brew beer, and they all tell me that they usually make about twice as much as they think they should, to account for all of the "testing" at various points. Are you using anything special to press the cheese, or just stuff you found around the kitchen? I can use a cast iron pan or something as a weight, and I was thinking of just getting a ring mold or maybe even a cake pan of some...
Quote: Originally Posted by kwilkinson Millhouse, my pops and I did some cheesemaking before I left home. Started off with the same soft cheeses, but he's gotten into hard, aged cheeses since I'vemoved away. He gets his rennet online, I can ask him for the source if you're really interested. Yeah, maybe this will be what prompts me to actually try it out. How is the cheese turning out? Good results?
Quote: Originally Posted by sho'nuff that chimp needs to have the same done to him on his face and gut without any anasthesia and done slowly for a period of 72 hours so as to not cause death but just severe pain and then with a hacksaw starting from the extremities sliced sushi style until reach its vital organs to death. and then i can only dream it would rot in a hell made specifically for it. This has to be one of the most horrific things...
Quote: Originally Posted by haganah http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/09/dining/09mini.html That is an interesting article, but there are some major points I disagree with. When I lived in the mountains, a pressure cooker was mission critical. Otherwise, basic things would take forever to cook. Second, without a bread machine, I can't make bread. I tried twice a weekend, for about 3 or 4 months to bake normal bread, and I could never get...
Quote: Originally Posted by Svenn If you take just a normal tea bag and put some milk in the cup, I can't drink it at all- it's just bland and flat tasting. I think the key is to get really strong, aromatic tea but I'm not sure what that would be. Thai iced milk tea is similar- the red tea they use is so strong it stains your hands for hours, but when cut with milk and sugar it's a real kicker. I agree. I rarely find tea strong...
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