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Posts by agjiffy

I care about the technical process only to the extent I view it as making a better product. If there were some new Robotailor machine that computer generated a pattern and spit out a suit, I'd be skeptical of the results and reluctant to use it. But if I tried it and I thought it was better I'd never look back. I'm not sure what I'd call it, but I'd probably refer to it as something other than bespoke. Bespoke would refer to the handmade garbage produced by old men in...
^can you post pics of the charvet and one of those better fitting 70e shirts?
That sounds like a definition that one would use if he had a suit that fit those exact specifications and wanted to define it as bespoke. Some of those things matter and some are totally unimportant. And if you meet a tailor that insists ona certain number of fittings then you should run. The suit is done when it's right, be it two fittings or six.
I suppose I don't really care what you call it, but if you had the choice of getting measured by Brian or Richard, and the price is the same, I can't imagine how someone could chose Brian or could be indifferent. You'd have to think that there is nothing in the process of cutting that is improved by actually seeing the subject. You would have to think that pattern making is simply applying a set of numbers without any reference to an actual body. I don't think that is the...
It would appear that A&S follows the same process with cutters doing the fitting: http://www.anderson-sheppard.co.uk/thenotebook/the-importance-of-fittings/
My huntsman trousers were all cut by pat Murphy. They literally have his initials on them because he was the cutter. And of course he didn't make them. He is a cutter. He cuts the fabric. That doesn't mean he sews the pieces together. There are trousers makers and coat makers throughout the row. But they don't cut fabric. That is why I'm using the word "cutter".
No idea where you get your info but the Savile row firms that I've used have a cutter doing the initial measurements, cutting and subsequent fittings. That covers kilgour and huntsman. My understanding is that RA is the same but I gave no personal experience. So what firms are you talking about where the head cutter won't measure or do the fittings?
Interesting. I've never heard a tailor denigrate another's work. Some of the Italian's hate the non-Italian clothes that I wear, but that has struck me more as a stylistic preference than an attack on someone else's work. I once begged a shoemaker to help me identify things wrong with another's shoes that I was wearing and I eventually got them to give some modest criticism (as well as an offer to try to fix them). Anyway, after doing this for a long time and spending...
I haven't Dopey but I would assume that peter can't contact old huntsman customers either because he is contractually restricted or because he doesn't feel that it is appropriate (or both). I think the split was amicable as Peter was particularly close with huntsman'so previous owners and wouldn't have left while the brand was under their watch, but that once they left it was pretty easy to take what I understand to be a magnificent offer with RA.
I don't think I share the same view of style as Roubi but he is passionate about the brand and a far as I can tell he stays out of Pat's way. I think my buying has shifted more toward Cifonelli than huntsman, but that has more to do with exchange rates than anything else.
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